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Since taking office, President Donald Trump has signed dozens of executive orders. And while some say Trump is using this presidential power at an unprecedented rate, one scholar said historical figures don’t necessarily back up that claim.

The Kathleen Dunn Show

A new study analyzing a recent eight-year span of American elections has found that voter ID laws suppress minority turnout at the polls and benefit the Republican Party.

WPR News

Gov. Scott Walker said fewer manufacturing jobs might not be such a bad thing for Wisconsin, as long as wages are increasing.

WPR News

The state Assembly will vote on a handful of bills Thursday.

WPR News

The state Legislature's top Republicans have suggested they're open to funding Wisconsin’s roads with money that would normally pay for expenses such as schools, prisons and health care. Such a move would continue a trend during Gov. Scott Walker’s administration where the state has used more and more general fund dollars to pay for transportation.

WPR News

Wisconsin lost more than 4,000 manufacturing jobs in the 12 months leading up to last September, marking the worst such period for the state since the end of the Great Recession.

WPR News

Business owners in La Crosse are saying no to the county government's plan for new road funding. The county board introduced the idea of a premier area resort tax (PRAT) in January as a new source of funding for roads.

WPR News

Plans for a $75 million state crime lab for the Milwaukee area will be discussed Wednesday afternoon by the State Building Commission.

WPR News

The Wisconsin Assembly voted 85-13 in favor of the so-called "right to try" bill. The legislation would allow certain patients to be prescribed drugs that have yet to be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

WPR News

The Wisconsin Legislature has passed a bill long sought by parents of children who suffer from seizures. The bill now heads to Gov. Scott Walker for his signature.

The Joy Cardin Show

Kevin Hardwick, an associate professor of political science at Canisius College in Buffalo, New York, says Trump may have a hard time closing the deal on a new federal health care law.

WPR News

Gov. Scott Walker is calling the federal health care overhaul bill "an important first step." The Republican plan to replace the Affordable Care Act was released Monday evening.

WPR News

Wisconsin voters approved $1.35 billion in borrowing referendums for public schools last year, the largest amount in more than 20 years.

WPR News

The Wisconsin Supreme Court has overturned an appeals court ruling, concluding the city of Madison must allow bus passengers to carry concealed weapons. The court ruled 5-2.

WPR News

The Trump administration may cut the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's budget by 25 percent under a draft budget proposal. Great Lakes mayors say the cuts could have disastrous effects on water quality and the regional economy.

The Kathleen Dunn Show

President Donald Trump's new executive order on immigration was signed Monday morning, and much like the original travel ban, it's likely to face a showdown in the courts as several organizations, including the American Civil Liberties Union, have vowed to file lawsuits against it.

WPR News

Jack Voight, a Republican who held the office from 1995 to 2007, is criticizing current Republican State Treasurer Matt Adamczyk’s support of a constitutional amendment that would cut the state treasurer's office.

WPR News

Close to 100 people attended a workshop Sunday in Milwaukee at Candela's Banquet and Conference Facility to discuss the rights of mixed-status immigrant families. Immigrant advocacy group Voces de la Frontera held the workshop.

WPR News

Vice President Mike Pence spoke to an invite-only event Friday in Janesville about the Affordable Care Act, town halls and more. Pence spoke to about 350 Blain Supply employees at the agriculture retailer based in Janesville and also held a listening session with local business leaders.

WPR News

Transportation funding is gearing up to be one of the crucial issues in the current state budget cycle, but it's not new. Lawmakers and governors have ignored repeated warning signs and put off the toughest decisions on roads, a cycle that began at least a decade ago.

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